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Mark81
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12/02/2020
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Day 3 blues, eyes burning, body aches, headache when will sleep come more naturally?

Posted in Quit experiences 12 Feb 2020
11 Comments

I've been a 30-50 12mg pack a day smoker for 15+ years I've recently quit, day 3 as we speak, so far I'm doing fairly well at side stepping mental triggers, & I've quite easily slipped out of mental cravings by distracting myself.

When will I be able to sleep and concentrate properly again? I've got what appears to be ulcers in my mouth, my body aches close to all over & a whopping headache. I have been using some nicotine mints will this just prolong the nicotine full blown withdrawal as its putting nicotine back in to my body? I haven't had any incubate mints since 8pm, if i keep taking them for a few weeks or using patches will it drag out the physical withdrawal process? is .. sorry rambling as I'm a bit sleepy deprived so that was a long way to ask a add simple question 😘 thanks everyone.

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11 Comments

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  • Happiness February 13, 2020 | 3:40
    you will be free of the actual nicotine addiction when about 72 hours from the last nicotine of any kind is taken. The harder part is accepting the change. Do not morn the fact but embrace the transformation to a non-smoker. Acceptance can be made easier by reading Allan Carr... which i have a link to. its free and well worth your time.
  • Red-67 February 13, 2020 | 6:43
    I love ya, girl, BUT.. the nicotine addiction is NOT gone in 72 hours !!
    It is true that, in general, nicotine is no longer detected in the blood after 72 hours.
    But, nicotine is converted to cotinine in the system, and cotinine can be detected in your blood for up to 10 days.
    Even that, is meaningless. It in no way means the addiction is gone, even in 10 days. We can measure the chemical
    in the blood, but there is NO WAY to determine how long the effects in the brain will last.
    That will vary greatly, depending on how long you smoked, how much, and how you build your mindset.
    Again, in very general terms, withdrawal will take about 3 weeks, from last injestion. How you handle the withdrawal is again,
    very different, across individuals, because, in the end, it is mostly a matter of mind control. Nicotine is the small part of this addiction to smoking..
  • Happiness February 13, 2020 | 7:33
    Red and i will agree to continue to agree to disagree. i sat tomatoe he says tomato.lol
  • Red-67 February 13, 2020 | 8:51
    It's not that simple :)
    Nowhere else, have I seen anyone, in the know, try to say that nicotine addiction is gone in 72 hours. Sure, blood test may show no nicotine in the system, but that in no way means the addiction is gone. Fortunately, even the chemical addiction, is broken in the mind, along with the addiction to smoking itself.
  • Lando, Hunter New England February 13, 2020 | 9:41
    Hi Mark

    You should go see your doctor. When my husband gave up (25 years ago) he got terrible mouth ulcers, along with other issues. He was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes. Not saying you have diabetes. Just saying see a professional.
  • Billie78 February 13, 2020 | 11:25
    Great job Mark! Hang in there! I’m 6 weeks in and have been using patches after briefly stopping them at 3 weeks. I’m with Red re nicotine. Yes the nicotine itself may or may not be out of the bloodstream but there are billions of nicotine receptors in the brains of smokers that have to prune back. If you can go without nicotine, fantastic. But it does not hurt to give your brain a tiny fraction of the nicotine while it heals. Not sure about ulcers but my sleep and concentration went silly for a couple of weeks. Think of this as part of brain and body healing
  • Robn February 13, 2020 | 21:00
    Hi Mark, I had mouth ulcers on and off for a few weeks after I quit. Pretty normal I think. Also found it hard to sleep for a few weeks.
    How long it lasts will vary for each individual, but it isn’t permanent and a small price to pay for the years we have abused our bodies.
    It will be worth it.....stay strong
  • Robn February 13, 2020 | 21:01
    Hi Mark, I had mouth ulcers on and off for a few weeks after I quit. Pretty normal I think. Also found it hard to sleep for a few weeks.
    How long it lasts will vary for each individual, but it isn’t permanent and a small price to pay for the years we have abused our bodies.
    It will be worth it.....stay strong
  • Happiness February 14, 2020 | 11:48
    80% is psychological. Accept and embrace the choice to being a non-smoker makes a world of difference. Have you read the free book i have made available by Allan Carr? What are you waiting for? Change your mind and change your life.
  • Billie78 February 14, 2020 | 22:31
    Spot on happiness. Psychological components are a very significant part of quitting. Psychological aspects are much more expansive than willpower/changing thinking though. There’s family history, trauma, stress tolerance, emotional awareness/regulation. Whether this means that nicotine therapy is needed in combination with/instead of behavioural/cognitive intervention, I think expanding our positions may be helpful. Also, Carr was a big part of my recovery. I think we can use bits off diff viewpoints
  • Leeann , Central Coast February 16, 2020 | 1:55
    Hi Mark, the mouth ulcers seem to be a cimmon trigger amongst a few as part of the withdrawel. I too am suffering with them in my quit. I think its the body going into shock and my sleep pattern is all over the shop at the moment too. Flu is another side affect as your body freaks out, i dont care about sny of these things. To me they are a small price to pay for getting rid if the addiction. You know we pumped those vile little poison sticks into ourselves for years. Allow the body sometime grace to adapt to the change. I tell myself its the battle of claiming freedom back of your mind and body. I believe it is, so buckle up and hang on tight, bcos those little poison sticks need to stay kicked to the curb.

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